Tag Archives: Infrastructure

Chile, France, and the Construction of the Santiago Metro

By Andra Chastain The Metro in Santiago, Chile, has an unlikely history. It opened to the public in September 1975, two years after the violent overthrow of Salvador Allende’s socialist government, while the country was reeling from the human rights … Continue reading

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‘Serfing’ Metropolitanism in Fin-De-Siècle Russia: Village Structures for Global Infrastructures

By Botakoz Kassymbekova, Technical University of Berlin In fin-de-siècle Russia, just as in many other parts of the world, rapid industrialization and the development of transportation and communication systems led to the growth of modern metropolises. Mass luxury hotels became … Continue reading

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Immigration, Communities, and Neighborhoods in Buenos Aires, 1880–1930

By Benjamin Bryce, University of Northern British Columbia In 1869, Buenos Aires was a small city of 178,000 inhabitants. Yet by 1914, it had grown to almost 1.6 million people and become the second largest city on the Atlantic coast … Continue reading

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Brahmin Boston and the Politics of Interconnectedness

By Noam Maggor, Cornell University The first age of globalization between around 1870 and World War I created a strategic new role for cities, making them into pivotal sites for the worldwide movement of capital, goods, and labor. And yet, … Continue reading

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Cosmopolitanism on the Move: Port Said around 1900

By Valeska Huber, German Historical Institute London Research on the Mediterranean and the Indian Ocean has stressed the importance of the opening of the Suez Canal as a transformative factor that had extensive reverberations throughout the region. In the decades … Continue reading

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Infrastructural Statecraft and the Rise of Just-in-Time Urbanism

By Boris Vormann, Freie Universität Berlin Containerization has led international trade to triple since the mid-1970s. This massive expansion and deepening of exchange networks would have been unthinkable without the construction of material transportation infrastructures in the world’s metropolitan agglomerations. … Continue reading

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City Life and Automobility in Twentieth-Century Ghana

By Jennifer Hart, Wayne State University On the eve of his country’s independence in the mid-1950s, Ghanaian journalist Moses Danquah claimed: “We are riding confidently on the crest of the wave to greater economic prosperity, to greater social and cultural achievements, … Continue reading

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On the Khartoum Omnibus: Stories of Sudan’s Cosmopolitanism

By Raphael Cormack, University of Edinburgh In July 2005 a helicopter carrying John Garang, leader of the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement and new vice-president of Sudan, crashed in Uganda. Garang and the 13 other passengers were all killed. The most … Continue reading

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Subaltern Cultures of Nature in Industrial Chicago

By Colin Fisher, University of San Diego U.S. environmental and cultural historians and American Studies scholars have long explored privileged Anglo Americans’ desire to come into contact with nature. We know that in response to the perceived ills of urban … Continue reading

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Some Reflections on Imperial Port Cities in the Age of Steam

Lasse Heerten, Freie Universität Berlin, and Daniel Tödt, Center for Metropolitan Studies, Technische Universität Berlin Let’s judge some books by their covers. In the recently flourishing literature on global and imperial history, port cities have become ubiquitous icons, visual shorthand … Continue reading

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