Tag Archives: Migration

The Making of Imperial Peripheries: The musseques in Late-Colonial Luanda

By Juliana Bosslet, SOAS, University of London Angolan magazines in the 1960s and early ‘70s often insisted that Luanda was “the most Portuguese” of all African cities. The supposed exceptionalism of the Portuguese colonial case led not only academics but … Continue reading

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Cosmopolitanism on the Move: Port Said around 1900

By Valeska Huber, German Historical Institute London Research on the Mediterranean and the Indian Ocean has stressed the importance of the opening of the Suez Canal as a transformative factor that had extensive reverberations throughout the region. In the decades … Continue reading

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Immigration and Metropolitan Revitalization in the United States

By Domenic Vitiello, University of Pennsylvania, and Thomas J. Sugrue, New York University Recent refugee crises, xenophobic nationalism, and calls to deport unauthorized immigrants remind historians of earlier eras in which cities and nations have taken opposing stances on immigration. … Continue reading

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“The ‘Urban Question’ is Now at the Center of Intellectual Life”: A Conversation with Rosemary Wakeman

The Conversations section of our blog seeks to foster critical exchange about the theoretical and methodological implications of bringing together global and urban history. The blog’s editors will occasionally interview scholars to discuss questions of global urban history, spanning across … Continue reading

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Pardo is the New Black: The Urban Origins of Argentina’s Myth of Black Disappearance

By Erika Edwards, University of North Carolina, Charlotte It was a typical day, nothing out of the ordinary. I, a young, small-town girl had landed in a foreign country to begin my study abroad. I knew nothing about Argentina and … Continue reading

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On the Khartoum Omnibus: Stories of Sudan’s Cosmopolitanism

By Raphael Cormack, University of Edinburgh In July 2005 a helicopter carrying John Garang, leader of the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement and new vice-president of Sudan, crashed in Uganda. Garang and the 13 other passengers were all killed. The most … Continue reading

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Subaltern Cultures of Nature in Industrial Chicago

By Colin Fisher, University of San Diego U.S. environmental and cultural historians and American Studies scholars have long explored privileged Anglo Americans’ desire to come into contact with nature. We know that in response to the perceived ills of urban … Continue reading

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Plural Pasts in Southeast Asian Port Cities

By Su Lin Lewis, University of Bristol Conflict and division characterize the way we often think of race relations in the colonial era, but the social history of Asia’s most multi-ethnic cities gives us a different view. The colonial scholar … Continue reading

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From Rural to City Dwellers: A New Book on Indians in Kenya

Sana Aiyar, Indians in Kenya: The Politics of Diaspora, Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2015, 384 pp., $49.95 / £36.95 / €45.00. Reviewed by Saima Nasar, University of Birmingham Indians have contributed to Kenya’s multiracial tapestry for centuries. At Independence, … Continue reading

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Black London: Two New Books on the Postcolonial British Capital

Marc Matera, Black London: The Imperial Metropolis and Decolonization in the Twentieth Century, Berkeley: University of California Press, 2015, 414 pp., $29.95 / £22.95, ISBN: 9780520284302 Kennetta Hammond Perry, London is the Place for Me: Black Britons, Citizenship and the … Continue reading

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